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    Nov 29, 2021  
Lee University Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Lee University Catalog 2021-2022

Course Descriptions


 

Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 591 - Directed Research


    This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate Studies in Education is needed.

    Credit Hours: 1
  
  •  

    EDUC 592 - Directed Research


    This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate Studies in Education is needed.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    EDUC 593 - Directed Research


    This course enables the student to pursue topics of interest in greater depth than is done in the regular curriculum. The course may be repeated. The Pass/Fail grade scale will be used. Approval by the Director of Graduate Studies in Education is needed.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 595 - Thesis Seminar


    This course will provide the structure, the format, the support, and the encouragement for the student to complete the thesis and present it to colleagues.

    Prerequisites
    Passing of mid-program evaluation.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    In some programs, the student may be able to select an approved elective in lieu of EDUC-595, but this varies depending on the degree program in which the student is enrolled. Students should work closely with the advisor or program director to ensure that they select the appropriate option for their individual program of study.
  
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    EDUC 596 - Internship I


    This internship will provide a broad, general perspective of an area school to the M.A.T. student. Interns will experience the multiple roles of the classroom teacher, as well as the organization and operation of the elementary, middle, or high school.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 597 - Internship II


    The internship will provide extensive instructional experiences to the M.A.T. student. The intern at this level will, under the direction of a cooperating teacher and principal, assume responsibility for instructional planning, implementation and evaluation.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-568, and the appropriate specialty methods class depending upon licensure and discipline.

    Credit Hours: 6
  
  •  

    EDUC 598 - Job-Embedded Practitioner Mentoring I


    This course is open to teachers who have been hired by a Tennessee school district on a Job-Embedded Practitioner License and are in their first year of employment.  Enrollment is required in both fall and spring semesters.  Course requirements include meeting in a seminar format to discuss classroom issues and the Professional Education Competencies.  The university mentor will observe and provide support for each teacher in his/her classroom on a regularly scheduled basis.

    Prerequisites
    Acceptance into the Job-Embedded Practitioner License program.

    Instructor permission required.

    Credit Hours: 2

  
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    EDUC 599 - Job-Embedded Practitioner Mentoring II


    This course is open to teachers who have been hired by a Tennessee school district on a Job-Embedded Practitioner License and are in their second or third year of employment.  Enrollment is required in both fall and spring semesters.  Course requirements include meeting in a seminar format to discuss classroom issues and the Professional Education Competencies.  The university mentor will observe and provide support for each teacher in his/her classroom on a regularly scheduled basis.

    Prerequisites
    Acceptance into the Job-Embedded Practitioner License program.

    Instructor permission is required.

    Credit Hours: 1

  
  •  

    EDUC 601 - Advanced Educational Research


    In this course, students will critically engage educational research as an expression of the scientific method and reflect on this process as it relates to the educator’s role. Graduate students will be challenged to know and comprehend paradigms of educational research; apply and analyze, statistical methodologies in current and proposed research, and finally synthesize and evaluate professional contributions in research. These experiences should prepare the candidate to develop and critically assess professional teaching and learning activities and then reflect on the process in a paper suitable for professional publication.


    Prerequisites
    EDUC 501 or equivalent

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 602 - History of American Education


    This course explores both formal schooling and informal education in America by analyzing the ways in which social and intellectual trends have influenced educational policy and practice. The course delineates many of the competing theories surrounding historic educational debates and relates the conflicts of the past to contemporary concerns about education in the United States.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 603 - Advanced Child Studies


    This course provides an advanced study of various theories of psychological and psychosocial development and implications of those theories on student learning. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 665 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Education


    This is a course in school law and ethics related to teaching and school administration. The course explores how America’s legal system copes with moral ambiguity and controversial ethical questions as they relate to teaching and learning. The course evaluates decisions and assesses various approaches to fundamental ethical dilemmas and the impact of law in contemporary society. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 675 - Integrating Technology Into School and Classroom Leadership


    This course will examine the technological and pedagogical skills that are necessary for administrators and instructional leaders in the 21st century.  It will introduce and analyze the frameworks upon which sound technological implementation in the classroom is formed, and it will consider the methods of leading instructional shifts that incorporate these principles.  Additionally, the role administrative technologies plays in making a school leader more effective and efficient will be explored.  A strong emphasis will be placed on critical analysis and problem-solving in the K-12 educational environment. 

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 680 - Literacy Instruction for Diverse Populations


    This course is designed to help candidates teach children from diverse populations who encounter literacy problems. Diagnostic tools and instructional strategies will be provided to help teachers understand students’ literacy problems and to better prepare them to instruct children who struggle with learning to read. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 683 - Instructional Leadership and Coaching


    This core course will focus on that which makes a school successful. During the course of instruction, students will investigate the nature of instruction, curriculum, assessment, and professional development. A secondary focus will be on using assessment and professional development to improve measured outcomes. The course will also explore leadership, change, and school culture as tools in improving the quality of instruction.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 684 - Curriculum Theory: Design and Assessment


    This course examines historical approaches, current theories, types of planning, and acceptable evaluative techniques in regard to curriculum and curriculum development. Guidelines for the use of assessment data and implementation issues related to accountability will also be studied.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 685 - Education Policy and Advocacy


    This course will explore the primary topics of educational advocacy related to public policy and practice. Students will assess the underlying motivating factors associated with policy advocacy and adoptions, consequences policies may have for social and educational well-being, as well as financial underpinnings related to legislative and policy implementations. The course will include theoretical frameworks for conceptualizing educational policy, roles professionals can play in building educational policy, and approaches professionals can use in implementing these roles.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 686 - Establishing and Maintaining Learning Communities


    This course examines the ways to connect schools and the various publics served by them in both a macro and micro perspective. Connections between community institutions and their roles and responsibilities to the school and family will be explored through class lectures, video presentations, field trips, observations, guest speakers, group discussions, and group activities.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 687 - Managing the Learning Environment


    This course is designed for practicing professionals (regular and special educators, school psychologists and counselors) as well those in leadership roles who function as advisors to teachers who serve children and youth that present behavioral challenges in the school or community. Using a case study approach it will revisit the theoretical models of human behavior and examine ways to analyze, identify, change, and maintain positive behavior in the classroom or community. An emphasis will be placed on the student’s leadership role as reflective practitioner who, as an agent of change, can advise in the establishment of class and school wide policies to effectively manage the learning environment.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 688 - Professional Writing for Publication


    This course is designed to help graduate students analyze, evaluate, and produce the types of writing commonly associated with academic publication. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 701 - Leadership Theory and Practice: Critical Issues in Educational Leadership and Higher Education


    This course is a critical analysis of leadership theory and practice, with an emphasis on how awareness of a strength’s philosophy can increase leadership effectiveness. The course intends to identify and define the connections between the professional dispositions and skills of doctoral students applied to educational leadership and relevant educational issues. Using group discussions, research papers, and individual reflection, students will develop and evaluate theoretical principles of leadership development and develop a personal approach to creating institutional change. Topics covered include the characteristics of leaders, identifying and leveraging one’s personal leadership style, maintaining ethical standards, leading in diverse environments, leading change and relationship between leaders and followers.

    This course will be conducted as a seminar. Student attendance and active participation are vital to the success of the course. All students are expected to come to class equipped to participate full in the discussion, whether in-person or remote.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    EDUC 703 - Quantitative Methods of Research


    This fundamental research course is designed to develop a working understanding of quantitative research methods and the basic concepts applied in descriptive and inferential statistics.  This introductory course will cover quantitative research principles, basic statistical procedures, and interpreting and reporting statistical results.  Throughout this course students will develop an original quantitative research proposal.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDUC 705 - Qualitative Methods of Research


    This foundational research course is designed to introduce students to the meaning and practice of qualitative research to create a working understanding of this methodology. This introductory course will cover the basic principles of qualitative research, including organizing, theoretical frameworks, data collection (interviewing, document analysis, and observations), designing research qustions, analysis, and validation protocols. This course exposes students to traditional methods of qualitative theory such as case study, grounded theory, narrative, phenomenology, and ethnography. This course utilizes the textbook, supplemental resources, lectures, discussions, videos, and student exercises. Throughout this course students will develop an original qualitative research proposal.

    Prerequisites
    None.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDUC 791 - Dissertation I


    This course is designed to introduce students to advanced research design, problem of practice dissertations, Institutional Review Boards (IRB), CITI Training, and how to coordinate dissertation advisors and committee members. This course will emphasize writing a problem of practice dissertation which includes: identifying and positioning a problem of practice, purpose statements, research questions, significance, and organization of the study.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    EDUC 792 - Dissertation II


    This advanced-level course leads students into a qualitative or quantitative framework of research and assists in the completion of the literature review (chapter 2) and methods and methodology (Chapter 3) for students’ dissertation topics. Specifically, this dissertation research-based seminar builds upon students’ academic writing skills and critical thinking skills required for educational research, including analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of existing scholarly literature. Throughout the course, students will explore the research and writing process, with an emphasis on conducting a systematic literature review. It is anticipated that this course will advance the student’s development as a scholar-practitioner through the assessment of researchable questions in K-12 education and/or higher education settings resulting in a dissertation proposal.

    Upon successful completion of the course, students will have completed an Ed.D. dissertation proposal of their introduction (Chapter 1), literature review (Chapter 2), and methods and methodology (Chapter 3). The student will go before the Graduate Education Committee (GEC) for Admission to Candidacy. This course serves as a final assessment of student readiness to complete the Ed.D. degree in professional practice. The faculty instructor will decide at the end of the course if oral or written comprehensive examinations are required at Lee University.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-791

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    EDUC 793 - Dissertation III


    This course will be managed by the doctoral candidate’s advisor as a directed study, engaging other resources and committee members as needed.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-792

    Credit Hours: 2
  
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    EDUC 794 - Dissertation IV


    This course will be managed by the doctoral candidate’s advisor as a directed study. The culmination of this course will be the successful completion of the dissertation as determined by the candidate’s committee. May be repeated.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-793

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    ENGL 530 - Seminar: Appalachian Literature


    This course will provide an overview of Appalachian history and culture, emphasizing the way in which the history of the region has impacted its art, music and literature, as well as the ways in which the culture of the Appalachian region has significantly affected Amercian culture.

    Credit Hours: 3

Education – Early Childhood

  
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    ECED 315 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education


    A course designed to give the prospective teacher an overview of the theoretical models of early childhood education and to provide a broad overview of the historical, sociological and philosophical foundations of the American education system.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-199 and EDUC-299, or MUED-225.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ECED 342 - Observation and Assessment of Young Children


    This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic assessment techniques appropriate for young children. Also covered are community and school resources instrumental in providing services and referrals.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ECED 401 - Early Childhood Methods


    Effective methods and materials for teaching in the preschool and kindergarten. This course is to be taken concurrently with ELED-402. An intensive practicum is an integral part of the methods block.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credit Hours: 2

Education – Elementary

  
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    ELED 340 - Principles of Classroom Instruction - Elementary


    A course designed to introduce students to the methods, skills, and strategies they will need as they become effective teachers in elementary classrooms. The course unites theory and practice by using the instructional methods of classroom discussion, presentations and analysis of case studies.  Co-requisite: READ371

    Prerequisites
    Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credit Hours: 2
    Notes
    Must be taken concurrently with READ-371 and READ-371S.
  
  •  

    ELED 395 - Teaching the Creative Arts


    Effective methods and materials for integrating arts across the curriculum in grades PK-8.


     

    Prerequisites
    Admission to Teacher Education Program.

    Credit Hours: 2

  
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    ELED 402 and 402L - Elementary Grades Methods and Lab


    Effective methods and materials for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking, science, math, and social studies in the elementary grades are included in this course. An intensive practicum is an integral part of the methods block.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to Teacher Education Program.

    Credit Hours: 4, plus 1 credit-hr lab
    Notes
    Requires co-requisite enrollment in ELED-402L (Methods Lab) for 1 credit hr.
  
  •  

    ELED 418 - The Teaching of Health and Physical Education, Grades K-5


    This course is designed to equip teacher licensure candidates with the required methods, skills and strategies they need to become effective physical education / health / wellness teachers in the K - 5 classroom.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to Teacher Education Program and SCED-340

    Credit Hours: 2
    Notes
    This course must be taken concurrently with its Secondary Education counterparts, SCED-418 and SCED-418L.
    FALL SEMESTER ONLY

Education – Middle Grades

  
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    EDMG 315 - Foundations of Middle Grades Education


    This course is designed to give the prospective teacher an overview of the theoretical models of middle level education and to provide a broad overview of the historical, sociological and philosophical foundations of the American education system. Students will explore preadolescent and young adolescent characteristics, middle grades teaching, student learning, and organizational characteristics of a middle level school. Twenty hours of tutoring or observations must be completed.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-199 and EDUC-299.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDMG 340 - Principles of Classroom Instruction - Middle Grades


    A course designed to introduce candidates to the knowledge of methods, skills, and strategies they will need as they become effective teachers in middle level classrooms.  The course unites theory and practice by using the instructional methods of classroom discussion, presentations, and analysis of case studies.

    Prerequisites
    Admission to the Teacher Education Program.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
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    EDMG 403 - Middle Grades Methods


    Effective methods and materials for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking, science, math and social studies in the intermediate grades are included in this course. An intensive practicum is an integral part of the methods block.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    EDMG 406L - Middle Grades Methods Laboratory


    This course is a co-requisite to the middle grades specialty methods courses. During the specialty methods courses, candidates will spend one-half day in each endorsement area applying the methods, skills, and strategies studies in the specialty methods courses in two middle grades classrooms.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315, and EDMG-340

    Credit Hours: 1
    When Offered
    FALL SEMESTER ONLY
    Notes
    Students enrolling in EDMG-406L must enroll concurrently in the two Middle Grades Specialty Methods courses appropriate for their endorsement areas.
  
  •  

    EDMG 412 - Middle Grades Social Studies Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching the social studies in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on literacy skills and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Other key topics include using technology, changing demographics, integrative curriculum and instruction, and community service. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the associated laboratory experience (EDMG-406L).

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315, and EDMG-340.

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    FALL SEMESTEER ONLY
    Notes
    Requires co-requisite enrollment in EDMG-406L (Middle Grades Methods Laboratory).
  
  •  

    EDMG 413 - Middle Grades English/Language Arts Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching English/language arts in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on developing reading and writing skills and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the associated laboratory experience (EDMG-406L).

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315, and EDMG-340

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    FALL SEMESTER ONLY
    Notes
    Requires co-requisite enrollment in EDMG-406L (Middle Grades Methods Laboratory).
  
  •  

    EDMG 415 - Middle Grades Mathematics Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching mathematics in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical problems, task analysis, learner activities, evaluation procedures, literacy, and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the associated laboratory experience (EDMG-406L).

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315, and EDMG-340

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    FALL SEMESTER ONLY
    Notes
    Requires co-requisite enrollment in EDMG-406L (Middle Grades Methods Laboratory).
  
  •  

    EDMG 416 - Middle Grades Science Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective instructional strategies for teaching principles associated with the middle school science disciplines. Evidence is placed on planning, science process skills, inquiry-based instruction, hands-on/minds-on activities, improvising materials, demonstrations, assessment technigues, literacy across the curriculum, and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the associated laboratory experience (EDMG-406L).

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-315 or EDMG-315, and EDMG-340

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    FALL SEMESTER ONLY
    Notes
    Requires co-requisite enrollment in EDMG-406L (Middle Grades Methods Laboratory).
  
  •  

    EDMG 512 - Middle Grades Social Studies Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching the social studies in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on literacy skills and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Other key topics include using technology, changing demographics, integrative curriculum and instruction, and community service. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the Internship I experience.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    EDMG 513 - Middle Grades English/Language Arts Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching English/language arts in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on developing reading and writing skills and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the Internship I experience.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
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    EDMG 515 - Middle Grades Mathematics Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective methods, skills, strategies, and problems of teaching mathematics in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical problems, task analysis, learner activities, evaluation procedures, literacy, and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the Internship I experience.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    EDMG 516 - Middle Grades Science Specialty Methods


    This course focuses on effective instructional strategies for teaching principles associated with the middle school science disciplines. Evidence is placed on planning, science process skills, inquiry-based instruction, hands-on/minds-on activities, improvising materials, demonstrations, assessment technigues, literacy across the curriculum, and the integrative nature of the curriculum. Candidates apply various teaching methods, strategies, and techniques during the Internship I experience.

    Credit Hours: 2

Educational Leadership

  
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    EDLR 510 - Foundations of Educational Leadership


    This course will provide an overview of American public school administration to include basic concepts, policies, practices, and principles of educational leadership at the local, state, and federal levels. Participants will examine the role and responsibilities of school administrators and issues impacting school administration.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 571 - School Finance and Management


    This course examines the fundamental financial management tasks and procedures in an individual school setting. Further, it develops concepts and skills necessary for the quality operation of educational facilities.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 572 - Organizational Theory


    The intent of this course is to study the behavior, structures, and underlying principles of educational organizations.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 573 - Curriculum and Supervision


    Students will gain knowledge and understanding about supervision and curriculum theory and its application to classrooms today.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 574 - Interpersonal Relationships


    This is an introductory, graduate-level course in interpersonal relations and group processes. It surveys a broad range of topics, including communication, power, managing conflict, leadership styles, and others related to the field of study.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 581 - School and Community Relations


    This course will comprehensively examine communication principles and the variety of forces that are involved in school and community relations. Application of essential public relations tools to enhance a school’s mission focused on student learning is a major course objective.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDLR 582 - School Personnel Administration


    This course represents a study of personnel administration in public school systems. The course examines selection, orientation, placement, compensation, transfers, separation, and staff development of instructional and support staff.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-565.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 585 - Advanced School Law


    This course is designed to acquaint students with emerging legal issues that will affect them in roles as educational decision-makers. Students enrolled in this course are expected to have a working knowledge of school law and the material covered in EDUC-565 or a comparable course.

    Prerequisites
    EDUC-565 or equivalent.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 596 - Education Leadership Practicum


    This course provides students with extensive supervised administrative experiences in local schools in levels PreK – 12.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 599 - Cross-Cultural Practicum


    This course provides students with extensive supervised administrative experiences at international placements in Levels PreK-12.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    EDLR 610 - School District Leadership


    Desire to obtain certification in school leadershipThis is a course in the theory and practice of organizational leadership skills, tasks, responsibilities and challenges as they are applicable to the school superintendency and other district level administrative positions.

    Prerequisites
    Desire to obtain certification in school leadership

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 667 - The Law of Higher Education


    This course examines legal issues relevant to American colleges and universities to provide students with the fundamental knowledge of higher education law for administrators. Topics include the legal governance of higher education, academic freedom, affirmative action, tort liability, and legal issues pertinent to the faculty and students.

    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    every spring
  
  •  

    EDLR 671 - School Business Leadership


    This course examines the fundamental financial management tasks and procedures at the school district level; further, it equips students with skills necessary for planning and operating educational facilities.

    Prerequisites
    EDLR 571, equivalent course or permission of instructor

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 681 - School and Community Relations


    This course will comprehensively examine communication principles and the variety of forces that are involved in school and community relations. Application of essential public relations tools to enhance a school’s mission focused on student learning is a major course objective.


    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 682 - School Personnel Administration


    This course represents a study of personnel administration in public school systems. The course examines selection, orientation, placement, compensation, transfers, separation and staff development of instructional and support staff.

    Prerequisites
    Successful completion of EDU 565 or equivalent

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 685 - Advanced School Law


    This course is designed to acquaint students with emerging legal issues that will affect them in roles as educational decision-makers. Students enrolled in this course are expected to have a working knowledge of school law and the material covered in EDUC 565 (School Law) or a comparable course.

    Prerequisites
    Successful completion of EDUC 565 or equivalent.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 690 - Middle School Leadership


    This course is designed to study the historical, sociological, psychological, and philosophical aspects of the middle level school. Discussion and activities focus on the purpose, function, and implications of current thinking regarding the learner, curriculum, and the middle level school. Students will explore middle grades teaching practice and student learning as well as examine the current literature regarding the middle level organization and practice. The goal of this course is to provide candidates with philosophical perspectives and the knowledge needed to provide leadership in supporting or implementing exemplary middle grades practices.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 691 - Instructional Design


    This course provides the student with the opportunity to develop a comprehensive understanding of what instructional design is and how it can effectively be used to improve classroom performance. At the center of this course is the use of a systematic process to design instruction in which every component and the learning environment is integral to success. Candidates will learn that careful planning and design are critical factors to the education enterprise.


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 692 - School Governance: Problems and Issues


    This is an elective course in the Educational Leadership strand of the Ed. S. program.  This course explores issues in educational governance and policy in the United States at the federal, state, and local levels.  There is a special focus on governance and policy development in Tennessee. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    EDLR 696 - Practicum in School District Leadership


    This course provides students with extensive supervised administrative experiences in local schools in levels PreK – 12. 


    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HEDS 500 - Higher Education Environments


    This course covers the history and current state of the diverse organizational structures within higher educational settings.      

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HEDS 501 - Research and Program Evaluation in Higher Education


    This course covers research theory, statistical methods and assessment techniques as used in the field of college student development.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    HEDS 510 - Higher Education Practicum


    Supervised fieldwork in approved institutional placements. Interns will gain competence in core areas of advising, mentoring, assessment, consultation and professional functioning.  

    Prerequisites
    Pre- or co-requisite: HEDS-514

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HEDS 514 - College Student Development


    An overview of student development theories and practices in higher education, emphasizing current standards of practice and emerging trends, particularly in Christian higher education.

    Credit Hours: 3

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 161 - Introduction to Engineering Science


    To provide an introduction to the ABET Accredited Engineering Degree and the profession of Engineering.  Includes presentation of the different disciplines of Engineering, professional and ethical aspects of engineering, introduction to problem solving and the engineering design process with aid of various computer application.

    Prerequisites
    Pre-requisite:  MTHS 161

    Credit Hours: 1
  
  •  

    ENGR 181, 182, 183, 184 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Courses used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in engineering. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor.

    Credit Hours: 1 (181), 2 (182), 3 (183), 4 (184)
    When Offered
    On demand.
  
  •  

    ENGR 361 - Statics


    The application of classical physics principles to study the static equilibrium configurations of rigid bodies. This course emphasizes the proper utilization of vector algebra and free body diagrams to solve problems in engineering statics including vector algebra/calculus of forces and moments, free body diagrams and equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, internal forces in trusses and frames, friction and applications to machines, and moments of inertia.

    Prerequisites
    PHYS-261

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGR 362 - Dynamics


    A study of Newtonian 2D and 3D motion of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies under the action of a net force. Oscillating systems are also addressed.

    Prerequisites
    PHYS-261 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ENGR 363 - Mechanics of Materials


    Stress; strain; Hooke’s law, extension, torsion, and bending; beam deflections, column buckling and combined stresses.

    Prerequisites
    ENGR-361

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ENGR 364 - Fluid Mechanics


    A study of the statistical modeling, statics, and dynamics of constrained and unconstrained fluids, using energy and momentum conservation.

    Prerequisites
    PHYS-261 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ENGR 367 - Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer


    Force, energy, and mechanical energy balances; flow in tubes, piping systems, packed and fluidized beds; pumping and metering; steady and unsteady state heat conduction; heat transfer in tubes and heat exchanges; radiation.

    Prerequisites
    Pre-requisite: ENGR-362

    Co-requisite: MTHS-361

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ENGR 371 - Electrical Circuits


    Introduction to analog circuits (composed of resistors, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers), application of Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws and Thevenin and Norton theorems to those circuits, and simulation of circuit design.

    Prerequisites
    MTHS-262, MTHS-371, MTHS-363, and PHYS-262 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGR 375 - Computational Physics


    A study of the techniques of numerical computer programming and the application of various numerical methods to solving problems in classical and modern physics.

    Prerequisites
    PHYS-261 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3

English Language and Literature

  
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    ENGL 090 - English as a Second Language


    An individualized course in English comprehension, conversation and composition for non-native speakers. ENGL-090 is required of all non-native speakers scoring below 80 on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). This course is offered for institutional credit only. Credit earned in this course will not count toward the composition requirement and grading will be pass/fail. Students will enroll concurrently in ENGL-091.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGL 091 - Basic Writing Skills


    A course intended to strengthen skills related to English language grammar, usage, sentence structure, and writing. It introduces students to the writing process, promotes writing based on readings, and encourages writing with confidence. ENGL-091 is the entry-level course for students scoring 80 or below on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Students earning a grade of C or above are eligible for ENGL-105; students who earn less than a C grade will earn a grade of “No Credit.” ENGL-091 involves three classroom hours and two hours of lab practice. This course does not fulfill any part of the English general education core requirement.

    Requires co-requisite enrollment in ENGL-091L and ENGL-090.

     

    Credit Hours: 4
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester

  
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    ENGL 106 - College Writing


    A writing course which seeks to teach students to develop clean, well-organized prose. The course emphasizes the writing process with an introduction to rhetorical strategies and culminates with an introduction to the library, research, and documentation. A grade of C or better in this course allows the student to enroll in Rhetoric and Research, ENGL-110 the following semester.

    Prerequisites
    ACT English score of 24 or below, or an SAT recentered verbal score of 560 or below.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
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    ENGL 110 - Rhetoric and Research


    A course focusing on four major writing projects; enables students to review the creative process as it applies to composition, learn the research methodologies and procedures of their chosen discipline (including computer-generated research), internalize approaches to critical thinking, apply basic principles of public speaking, and perform literary analysis.

    Prerequisites
    ACT English score of 25 or higher, or an SAT recentered verbal score of 570 or higher, or completion of ENGL-106 with a grade of C or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
    Notes
    This course is also offered as HONR-EN110 for students in the Kairos Honors Program.
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
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    ENGL 221 - Western Literature: Ancient to Renaissance


    Selected literary masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance world literature studied in relation to cultural context.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
    DAL
  
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    ENGL 222 - Western Literature: Enlightenment to Postmodern


    Selected literary masterpieces of the Enlightenment, nineteenth century, and twentieth century studied in relation to cultural context. 

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110 

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
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    ENGL 290 - Special Topics in English


    A course presenting various topics and research concerns. The topic will change to meet student demand and interest.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110.

    Credit Hours: 1, 2, or 3
  
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    ENGL 300 - Theories of Reading and Writing (W)


    ENGL-300 is designed to acquaint English majors with significant issues within the discipline including critical approaches to reading, writing, teaching, and research. The course introduces literary theory in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with a brief overview of the history of criticism. Students will apply critical theories to a number of literary texts.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
  
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    ENGL 302 - The English Language


    This course is intended to give the student an in-depth look at the structure of the English language, focusing on traditional and alternative theories of grammar and principles of linguistics with applications for second-language acquisition.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
  
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    ENGL 308 - Composition Theory (W)


    This course introduces students to the field of composition studies. It provides a historical overview of approaches to understanding and teaching writing, and it emphasizes the prominent current theories about writing’s composition, reception, and function within contemporary culture. Students will work both to understand their own writing processes more fully and to learn theoretically-informed strategies for teaching or tutoring other writers.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or EDMG-315

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring Semester
  
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    ENGL 309 - Rhetoric for Writers (W)


    A survey of the theories and techniques of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the present. Particular attention is given to the ways in which contemporary writers can create appropriate rhetorical strategies for communicating in their own social and cultural contexts.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
  
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    ENGL 311 - Foundations of Literature in English


    This course offers students an opportunity to study the great authors of British literature from the 8th to the 18th century. It provides in depth study of masterworks that have influenced later literature written in English due to the writers’ linguistic contribution and artistic stature in the language.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
  
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    ENGL 312 - British Literature: 1798 to the Present


    A survey of English literature from the Romantic Movement to the present.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring Semester
  
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    ENGL 313 - United States Literature I: Colonial Period to 1865


    A survey of American literature from the founding of the colonies to the Civil War.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
  
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    ENGL 314 - United States Literature II: 1865 to the Present


    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring Semester
  
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    ENGL 315 - Young Adult Literature


    A survey of young adult literature in a variety of media and genres with emphasis on the use of literature in the junior and senior high school classrooms. Required for teacher licensure in English. This course does not fulfill the core literature requirement.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or EDMG-315

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
  
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    ENGL 320 - Women Writers


    Selected literary masterpieces by women of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, studied in relation to their cultural context.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or permission of instructor

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGL 321 - Appalachian Studies


    This course will provide an overview of Appalachian literature and culture, emphasizing the way in which the history of the region has impacted its art, music, and literature.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or permission of instructor

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGL 322 - Contemporary Latin American Writers


    A study of Latin American cultures through reading, in translation, fiction and poetry written by contemporary Latin American writers.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or permission of instructor

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    ENGL 323 - Southern Literature


    A chronological survey of the literature of the American South.  This course examines Southern American fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama in its cultural context from colonial times to the present.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-300 or permission of instructor

    Credit Hours: 3
 

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