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    Oct 07, 2022  
Lee University Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Lee University Catalog 2016-2017 [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 

Latin American Studies

  
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    LASP 447 - Latin American Politics


    This course examines the politics and issues in Latin America focusing on the emergence of modern political regimes in the region, how those regions interact, and Latin America’s role in the global political system.

    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: HIST-212 or PLSC-250.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LASP 452 - Latin America and the United States


    A historical examination of the nature of relations between Latin American nations and the United States. Topics will include Latin American and United States foreign policies and actions from early in the nineteenth century to the present, including economic, social and cultural relations in the Western Hemisphere, as well as political relations and diplomacy.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LASP 455 - Latin American Media


    This course studies the development and distinctive characteristics of Latin American media in various cultural and national settings. The course will examine print, radio, film, music industry, commercial & non-commercial television, cable, digital media, business practices, programming, laws & regulations, ethics, advertising, audience feedback, production and distribution, and careers in Latin American mass media.

    Credit Hours: 3

Leadership

  
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    LEAD 202 - Self-Leadership


    This course is a study of self-leadership characteristics and skills that apply to effective leadership.  Various personal inventories, self and group assessments, along with personal reflection will be included to examine each student’s present and future self-leadership potential.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.

Linguistics

  
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    LING 201 - Chinese for Business: Language and Culture


    This is a course introducing students to the concept of the interaction of language and culture in a specific target language - Chinese for Business purpose. The course will also provide a basic and limited oral introduction to the target language and its use in specific contexts, especially the international business context. This course meets the language requirement for Bachelor of Science students only. (Bachelor of Science students with two years of high school foreign language or proficiency at the 112 level may take three hours of a foreign language at the intermediate level to fulfill the language requirement.) The course may be repeated once for elective credit, provided the topic is different than that taken the first time.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LING 201 - Introduction to Language and Culture


    A course introducing students to the concept of the interaction of language and culture in a specific target language. The course will also provide a basic and limited oral introduction to the target language and its use in specific contexts. This course meets the language requirement for Bachelor of Science students only. Course may be repeated once for elective credit as long as the topic of the second course is different from the topic of the first course.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
  
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    LING 201 - Japanese Language and Culture


    This is a course introducing students to the concept of the interaction of language and culture in a specific target language. The course will also provide a basic and limited oral introduction to the target language and its use in specific contexts. This course meets the language requirement for Bachelor of Science students only. (Bachelor of Science students with two years of high school foreign language or proficiency at the 112 level may take three hours of a foreign language at the intermediate level to fulfill the language requirement.) The course may be repeated once for elective credit, provided the topic is different than that taken the first time.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LING 201 - Thai Language and Culture


    This is a course introducing students to the concept of the interaction of language and culture in a specific target language. The course will also provide a basic and limited oral introduction to the target language and its use in specific contexts. This course meets the language requirement for Bachelor of Science students only. (Bachelor of Science students with two years of high school foreign language or proficiency at the 112 level may take three hours of a foreign language at the intermediate level to fulfill the language requirement.) The course may be repeated once for elective credit, provided the topic is different than that taken the first time.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LING 302 - English Language Structure and Theory


    This course is intended to give the student an in-depth look at the structure of the English language, focusing on traditional and alternative theories of grammar and principles of linguistics with applications for second-language acquisition.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
  
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    LING 380 - Introduction to Linguistics


    An introduction to scientific language study including morphology, phonology, syntax, pragmatics and the nature of language.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
  
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    LING 381 - Language Acquisition and Development


    An investigation of the cognitive processes of first and second language acquisition and development with special attention to the acquisition of literacy, language diversity and bilingualism.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring Semester
  
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    LING 382 - English Language Center Seminar


    A course to prepare and mentor students who are working with English Language Learners (ELLs) in Lee University’s English Language Center. Through assigned readings, guided discussions, and supervised teaching experiences, students will develop knowledge and skills for designing and delivering effective English language instruction for ELLs. 

    Repeatable for credit.

    Credit Hours: 1
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring

  
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    LING 415 - Sociolinguistics and Second Language Acquisition


    Explores the meaning of language variation in different contexts with a focus on second language acquisition. Addresses the influence of a wide range of different social variables on the use of language, and what our use of language tells us about what it means to be a human being created in the image of God.

    Prerequisites
    LING-380

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LING 480 - Linguistics for Teaching English as a Second Language


    A presentation of the linguistic, psycholinguistic and sociocultural dimensions of second language teaching and learning.

    Prerequisites
    LING-380 and LING-381

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring Semester
  
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    LING 481 - History of the English Language


    An introduction to the historical development of the English language from its Indo-European background through Old, Middle and Modern English.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    LING 482 - Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)


    A comprehensive study of the knowledge and skills necessary for students to become effective teachers of English to speakers of other languages in grades Pre-K through 12. Course topics focus on classroom methods, approaches and strategies to facilitate acquisition of English as a second language. The course includes a 30 clock-hour practicum.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL/LING 480

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
    Notes
    This course is service- enhanced and requires co-requisite enrollment in LING-482S.
  
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    LING 495 - World Languages and Faith: A Capstone Seminar


    A capstone seminar focusing on the Christian foreign language major’s perception of God’s creative purpose in two areas foundational to an informed sense of Christian vocation: second-language learning and instruction, and linguistics and cultural expression. This course affords students, as Christian professionals with a biblical understanding of God’s calling, the opportunity to articulate appropriate responses to questions arising from the interaction of their particular discipline and faith.

    Prerequisites
    THEO-231

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall and Spring semester
    Notes
    Required of all foreign language majors.
  
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    TESL 200 - Introduction to TESOL


    A course designed to introduce the student to the discipline of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) by providing an overview of the historical context of the discipline as well as the current linguistic, educational, and social needs that it addresses.  Career and professional development opportunities in the field are explored as well.

    Prerequisites
    Pre- or co-requisite: ENGL-110

    Credit Hours: 2
  
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    TESL 400 - Second Language Acquisition


    An overview of current knowledge and theories related to second language acquisition, with an emphasis on application to teaching English to speakers of other languages.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL/LING-302 and ENGL/LING-380

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    TESL 405 - Teaching Grammar to English Language Learners


    An examination of the grammatical features of English, focusing on those which present special difficulties for English language learners, with an emphasis on a task-based approach to developing and evaluating materials for teaching grammar.  This course contains a service learning component.

    Prerequisites
    ENGl/LING-302 and ENGL/LING-380

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    TESL 410 - ESL Curriculum Design and Assessment


    A course designed to prepare students with key concepts related to curriculum development and assessment for PreK-12 ESL (English as a Second Language) students in the United States, as well as for second language learners in other countries.

    Prerequisites
    TESL 200, LING-302 and LING-380

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    TESL 415 - Sociolinguistics and Second Language Acquisition


    Explores the meaning of language variation in different contexts with a focus on second language acquisition. Addresses the influence of a wide range of different social variables on the use of language, and what our use of language tells us about what it means to be a human being created in the image of God.

    Prerequisites
    LING-380

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    TESL 490 - Teaching English as a Foreign Language


    A course to prepare students with hands-on experience and skills to teach English to young and adult learners in an overseas context.

    Credit Hours: 3

Marketing

  
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    MKTG 309 - Principles of Marketing


     

    This course is an introduction to the nature and functions of marketing. It includes the study of the integrated activities utilized in the movement of goods and services from producer to consumer while addressing governmental and consumer relationships. This course investigates the processes and methods of product development, promotion, distribution, and pricing.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MKTG 350 - Marketing & Consumer Behavior


    This course examines the consumer-firm relationship using contemporary behavioral science theory and current business practices. A thorough study of the essentials in consumer decision making. Concepts from the fields of sociology and psychology are applied to problems encountered in marketing to various consumer groups.

    Prerequisites
    MKTG-309

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MKTG 360 - Product Development and Brand Management


    This course presents an analysis of the lifestyle process of goods and services from conception to purchase by the ultimate consumer. A thorough examination of brand management strategies is explored and applied throughout the process. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to design and implement successful product development strategies that deliver value to the consumer.

    Prerequisites
    MKTG-309

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MKTG 400 - Channel Management


    Throughout this course, students will learn how to design, develop, maintain, and manage go-to-market relationships in order to create a sustainable competitive advantage. The course will focus on managing distribution strategies to synergize marketing and sales efforts while preserving the fluid channel structure of today’s dynamic marketplace.

    Prerequisites
    MKTG-360

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MKTG 410 - Global Marketing


     

    This course provides an introduction to global marketing theory and research with practical examples of solutions to complex international problems. It focuses on the political, legal, economic, and cultural considerations inherent in global business and their relationship to market decision making.

    Prerequisites
    MKTG-309 and BUSN-353 or consent of Department Chair

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MKTG 420 - Pricing Theory


    This course enables students to gain a practical and theoretical understanding of price theory using basic operations management theory and pricing models. Students will gain an understanding of how to classify markets and products in varying markets. The course focuses on applying dynamic pricing, value based pricing, and pricing theory in general. Pricing theory is imperative for an organization to balance consumer utility and expectations while producing a sufficient business profit.

    Prerequisites
    MKTG-360

    Credit Hours: 3

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 098 - Elementary Algebra


    This course is a beginning course in algebra for students who have not mastered algebra in high school.  The course includes a review of general arithmetic, the real number system, the fundamentals of algebra, linear equations, graphing, exponents and radicals, factoring, functions, systems of linear equations, rational expressions and equations, and quadratic equations.  The applications of these concepts to real life situations will be examined throughout the course  This course will not meet any college mathematics requirements, but will serve the purpose of preparing students for MATH-099, MATH-101 and MATH-201.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 099 - Intermediate Algebra


    A preparatory algebra course designed for students who have had only one year of algebra in high school or those who need a review in algebra before enrolling in MATH-111.  The course includes basic algebraic principles and techniques as applied to number systems, polynomials, factoring and systems of equations and graphs.  The applications of these concepts in real-life situations are examined throughout the course.  The course will count as an elective in terms of credit hours (three semester hours), but it will not satisfy the general requirement of three hours of mathematics for graduation. 

    Prerequisites
    MATH-098 or placement by the math placement exam.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 100 - Introduction to Algebra (DAL)


    This beginning algebra course prepares students for college-level algebra content.  Foundational concepts covered in this course include topics of systems of equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radical expressions, and quadratic equations.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
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    MATH 101 - Contemporary Mathematics


    A survey of mathematical topics designed to develop an appreciation of the uses of mathematics. Selected topics will include problem solving, mathematical modeling, logic and sets, statistics, and the mathematics of finance.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 18 or SAT equivalent, or completion of MATH-098 or MATH-099 with a grade of C or better, or placement by the math placement exam.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 109 - Concepts of Mathematics I


    Develops the real number system (including natural numbers, whole numbers, integers, rational numbers and irrational numbers) stressing properties and algorithms. Problem-solving and set theory are emphasized. Elementary algebra will be stressed with application to problem solving. Designed to equip students to teach mathematics in elementary school.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 18 or higher or SAT equivalent or completion of MATH-098 or MATH-101 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 110 - Concepts of Mathematics II


    Decimals, percents, elementary probability, methods of counting, statistics and the normal curve, plane and solid geometry, and the Cartesian coordinate system. Problem-solving is emphasized.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 18 or higher or SAT equivalent, or completion of MATH-109 with a grade of C- or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 111 - College Algebra


    The real number system; relations and functions; algebraic functions; linear, quadratic and higher degree equations; complex numbers; graphing; systems of equations; and applications through the use of word problems. Intended primarily for students majoring in Education, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Accounting.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 20 or SAT equivalent, or completion of MATH-099 with a grade of C or better, or placement by the math placement exam.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Students entering this course with an ACT mathematics score of 21, 22, or 23 must also enroll in a two-week lab sequence, meeting for one hour per day. Attendance is required at all sessions.
  
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    MATH 121 - Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (DAL)


    Review of basic arithmetic operations: ratio, proportion and variation; concepts of functions; graphs, linear quadratic equations and relations; trigometric functions and applications; introductory plane geometry.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
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    MATH 151 - Introduction to Statistics (DAL)


    This course serves as a first course in statistics.  The foundational elements of descriptive and inferential statistics are presented in broad context with elementary examples from a wide range of disciplines.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 19, or SAT equivalent.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students. Does not fulfill the Introduction to Statistics requirement for traditional undergraduate programs requiring MATH-161.
  
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    MATH 161 - Introduction to Statistics


    An introduction to techniques for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.  The primary emphasis is on the analysis of data sets to facilitate informed decision-making processes.  Topics include sampling methods, summaries of data, descriptive statistics, probability, distributions correlation, and regression.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 19 or SAT equivalent, or completion of MATH-099 with a grade of C or better, or placement by the math placement exam.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 171 - Algebra for Calculus


    A rigorous introduction to the foundations of Algebra: complex numbers; equations and ineqalities; functions and transformations; inverse functions; polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Intended primarily for students majoring in Science or Mathematics who will be taking Calculus I.

    Prerequisites
    ACT mathematics score of 20 or SAT equivalent, or completion of MATH-099 with a grade of C or better, or placement by the Math Placement Exam.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Students entering this course with ACT scores of 20, 21, or 22 must also register for a two-week laboratory sequence meeting one hour per day. Attendance is required for all sessions.
  
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    MATH 172 - Trigonometry


    Measurement of angles, solution of right triangles, applications to the “real world,” identities, graphs of trigonometric functions, solution of oblique triangles, law of sines, law of cosines, trigonometric form of complex numbers, DeMoivre’s Theorem, and polar coordinates.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-171 with a grade of C- or better, or equivalent course work.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 231 - Foundations of Geometry


    Topics include axiomatic method, triangles and circles, parallelism, constructions, and modern concepts of both Euclidean and non- Euclidean geometry.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-111 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    (This course will not satisfy an elective requirement for MATHS.BS majors).
  
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    MATH 250 - Introduction to Programming


    An introduction to scientific and mathematical programming with MATLAB. The primary emphasis is on the development and implementation of algorithms that solve practical scientific problems using MATLAB. Topics include vectors, matrices, selection statements, loop statements, data structures, and advanced functions. Computer-assisted instruction.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 261 - Elementary Probability and Statistics


    Topics include measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, distributions of random variables, probability, joint probability, conditional probability, regression and correlation, discrete probability functions, estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence limits, analysis of variance, inferences concerning two or more variables, sign test, Mann-Whitney U test, runs test, and rank correlation.

    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: MATH-111 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
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    MATH 270 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    A course used to comply with requests for special topics and studies in mathematics. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Credit Hours: 1 - 4
  
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    MATH 271 - Calculus I


    Definition and formulas, rate of change, derivatives, and application of functions. The study and application of indefinite and definite integrals.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-111 and MATH-112 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
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    MATH 272 - Calculus II


    Applications of basic integration, advanced methods of integration, sequences and series.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
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    MATH 273 - Calculus III


    Vectors and vector calculus, partial derivatives, gradients, double and triple integrals, centroids, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line integrals, surface integrals, and Stoke’s theorem.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
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    MATH 310 - Logic and Sets


    A cohesive treatment of foundational mathematics including the topics of elementary mathematical logic, mathematical proof, set theory, relations, and functions.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 321 - Numerical Analysis


    A course providing both a mathematical and computational emphasis on the creation, assessment, implementation and modification of numerical algorithms in science and mathematics.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 351 - Introduction To Linear Algebra


    An introduction to the algebra of matrices, vectors, determinants, solutions of systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, Eigenvectors, Eigenvalues and canonical forms.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 353 - Discrete Mathematics


    An introductory course in discrete mathematics stressing problem solving techniques using an algorithmic approach. This course will include recursion, counting principles, probability and algorithmic processes.  Graphs, trees, networks, and problems effectively modeled with these constructs will also be studied.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 and MATH-310 with a minimum grade of C- in each.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 361 - Mathematical Probability


    This course is intended to provide students with a rigorous mathematical foundation for the analysis of uncertainty and to equip students with a working knowledge of the theory of probability.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 370 - Special Topics: Mathematical Modeling


    Systems dynamic modeling, including discrete dynamical systems, stochastic processes, feedback loops, difference equations, recurrence relations.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a B or better.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 371 - Differential Equations


    First order and simple higher order differential equations with applications, linear differential equations, systems of DE, Laplace transform, series solutions and numerical methods.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 with a minimum grade of C-; MATH-273 strongly recommended.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 375 - Mathematical Modeling


    Systems dynamic modeling, including discrete dynamical systems, stochastic processes, feedback loops, difference equations, and recurrence relations.  Computer-assisted instruction.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a grade of B- or better, or equivalent course work

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 380 - Introduction to Research


    An introduction to the process of conducting mathematics or mathematics education research. Mathematical topics will be explored with an emphasis on discovery, making conjectures, testing those conjectures, and proof. Topics in mathematics education will be explored with an emphasis on how to research the teaching and learning of mathematics.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a grade of B or higher, and permission of instructor.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
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    MATH 393 - History of Mathematics


    Study of major contributors and their contributions to mathematics; early beginnings to modern day; and how certain areas of mathematics began.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-271 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 423 - Financial Mathematics


    This course, which covers topics of time value of money, annuities, bonds, immunizations, derivatives, options, hedging, and swaps, provides a solid foundation for students who are interested in becoming actuaries or who plan to sit for the Financial Mathematics exam.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 with a minimum grade of C

    Credit Hours: 4
  
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    MATH 441 - Real Analysis


    A rigorous introduction to the foundations of real analysis: real numbers, sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and series. The emphasis is on establishing and correlating the various properties rather than numerical problem solving.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 and MATH-310 with a minimum grade of C- .

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 445 - Complex Variables


    This course will explore the concepts of differentiability and integrability of functions of complex variables. It will include an introduction to the complex numbers and the complex plane, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, Cauchy’s theorem and its consequences, connections to power series, and the residue theorem and its applications.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-273 and MATH-310.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 451 - Linear Algebra


    Applications of elementary linear algebra to real world problems including Leontief Economic Models, Markov Chains, theory of games, convex sets and linear inequalities, corner-point method and linear programming, the simplex method, matrix applications in genetics applications, constructing of curves as surfaces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, and computer graphics.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-351 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 461 - Introduction to Modern Algebra


    An introduction to the basic concepts of abstract algebra, including the topics of mapping, relations, number systems, groups, rings, fields, and integral domains.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 and MATH-310 with a minimum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MATH 465/475 - Practicum in Teaching


    A practicum which gives students the opportunity to gain teaching experience, enhance their knowledge of natural science and mathematics, and acquire skills that make them more attractive to prospective graduate schools.

    Prerequisites
    Successful completion of 15 hours of regular major courses in their program. Requires approval of application and permission of instructor.

    Credit Hours: 1
  
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    MATH 490 - Senior Seminar


    A weekly presentation by staff and/or senior mathematics majors on matters of current interest in the mathematical field. Participants gain experience in evaluating literature and presenting scientific papers. One semester required of all math majors.

    Prerequisites
    MATH-272 with a miminum grade of C-.

    Credit Hours: 1
  
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    MATH 495 - Mathematics in Faith and Practice


    Senior Capstone course for majors.  Comparative study of related scientific, philosophical, and theological ideology within mathematics.  Through lecture, research papers, and guided class discussion, an attempt is made to demonstrate the necessity and possibility of harmonizing mathematics and biblical truth.  Students are encouraged to develop a philosophy of mathematics which integrates a statement of faith.

    Prerequisites
    THEO-231, and a minumum of 18 credit hours within the major including MATH-310.

    Credit Hours: 3

Ministry Studies

  
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    MCOU 230 - Crisis Intervention Counseling


    A survey of principles and techniques for telephone counseling.  Designed especially to prepare non-professionals for crisis intervention based on Christian values within the limits of telephone contact.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
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    MCOU 451 - Theories of Counseling


    A survey designed to acquaint the student with the underlying principles, major theories, and methods commonly employed in individual counseling from a Christian perspective.

    Prerequisites
    PSYC-250

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
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    MCOU 456 - Methods of Counseling


    Explores issues that deal with becoming and being a counselor by examining the various agencies, styles, methods, and categories of counseling from a Christian perspective.

    Prerequisites
    PSYC-250

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
  •  

    MLDR 540 - Church Leadership and Management


    This course outlines key elements involved in leading the organization of the church.  It will focus on four key areas of church leadership:  leading through church business, leading through relationships, leading through church programs, leading through mission.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MLDR 542 - Leadership Development


     

    This course provides a basic knowledge of leadership development using several contemporary leadership theories to aid in preparing ministers in the context of a Christian worldview.  Further, it acquaints students with a development model for equipping and training followers in service mindedness and servant leadership through mentoring and coaching.  Current issues and trends affecting organizational change will provide a framework for the course readings.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MLDR 544 - Spirituality, Ethics and Leadership


    This course instructs students in how to lead from the core of one’s being as opposed to leading based on environment or outside forces.  It will focus on the minister’s personal life and growth, depth in spirituality, self-assessment, and personal values that affect the leadership of a particular organization such as a local church or parachurch ministry.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MLDR 546 - Strategic Leadership


    This course provides an understanding of ways to move an organization or church forward.  It will focus on leading through motivation, leading through communication, strategic leadership to bring about change, and conflict leadership (including conflict resolution, conflict management, and analysis of conflict styles).  It will also focus on preparing the church for the future through forecasting and futurism.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MLDR 590 - Leadership Studies Final Project


    This course is intended as a final research project within the MINST program.  Students will research a specific area within leadership ministry and provide evidence of biblical, theological, or social science research.  In addition, students will prepare a project presentation based on the questions raised by the foundational research.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MLDR 593 - Leadership Studies Internship


    This course is designed for students who have not had practical experience in leadership ministry.  It may be done in lieu of a final project so that students may experience supervised leadership ministry.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
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    MMST 500 - Research Seminar


     

    This course introduces the principles and procedures of scholarly research and writing. Particular emphasis is placed on research and writing appropriate to graduate studies in ministry.

    Prerequisites
    N/A

    Credit Hours: N/C
    When Offered
    TBA

  
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    MMST 510 - Special Topics in Ministry Studies


    This course is intended to provide students the opportunity to explore aspects of ministry which are current and relevant to the degree, but are outside the scope of required degree curriculum. May be repeated for credit.

  
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    MMST 530 - Christian Spirituality and Ministry


     

    This course equips men and women for a ministry of leading God’s people into a life of Christian maturing. It is designed to provide students with the knowledge, resources and approaches for fostering spiritual formation in faith communities. The course will explore the biblical and theological foundations of Christian spirituality, the role of the social sciences in better understanding spiritual development, and the integration of traditional Christian practices in the formation and discipleship process.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MMST 532 - Perspectives on Leadership


     

    This course will provide an overview of various models of leadership, their appropriateness for use within communities of faith, and cultural influences on contemporary conceptualizations of leadership. Through the analysis and critique of the models from a faith perspective, students will be able to articulate their approach to leadership and its effects on their ministry settings.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MMST 534 - Practical Theology


     

    This course introduces students to the discipline of practical theology by engaging theological reflection upon the practice of ministry and church life. Rather than remaining in a contemplative mode of the traditional theological task, practical theology stresses the transformative character of doing theology by examining the underlying theological assumptions and foundations of the church’s life and praxis. Students will learn to assess the church’s actions for what they could or should be from a theological standpoint, yet also learn to describe and assess these actions as they truly exist. This theological and practical examination of the church will focus on areas where thought and praxis overlap.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    MMST 536 - Principles of Bible Study


    This course prepares students for personal and community Bible study, using the Inductive Study Method. The inductive method utilizes a canonical approach and focuses on the rhetorical aspects of the biblical text. The method seeks to understand the author’s intent as well as its relevance for the contemporary world. The course emphasizes direct engagement with biblical texts through the disciplined use of sound hermeneutical principles.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MMST 538 - Creative Preaching and Teaching


    This course provides a broad study of homiletics and teaching using non-traditional and creative approaches, while seeking to maintain the integrity of the pulpit.  It will integrate innovative forms and multiple learning styles into sermon and lesson preparation so the student will be able to communicate the Gospel to a wide variety of audiences.


    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MMST 539 - Christian Faith and Culture


     This course explores the relationship between faith and culture from a Christian apologetic perspective. Various aspects of culture are analyzed, including popular culture, generational trends, technological innovations, multiculturalism, and religion, with the intent of developing Christian ministry praxis for engaging contemporary culture.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MMST 570 - Discipleship in the New Testament


    A course designed to present to the students an overview of the writings of the New Testament, while providing an in-depth synthesis of the New Testament’s purview of discipleship. Practical application will be made as the students create a contextual plan of discipleship based on that synthesis.

    Prerequisites
    none

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MWST 560 - Biblical and Theological Foundations of Worship


     

    The course will explore the concept and practice of worship in the Old and New Testaments, worship in the lives of biblical characters, and the biblical roots of contemporary worship practices. The course will explore theological foundations for understanding worship practice, assesses theological implications of personal and corporate worship ministry, and equip worship leaders in the application of a theology of worship in specific ministry contexts.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MWST 562 - History of Christian Worship


     

    This course provides an overview of the history of Christian worship from the New Testament era through the present. Special attention will be given to the practices, rituals and symbols of worship in selected Christian traditions. The course will identify historical movements and leaders who significantly shaped current perspectives of Christian worship.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MWST 564 - Worship Leadership for the Contemporary Church


     

    This course will examine practical leadership issues of worship ministry. The course will survey contemporary models and practices of worship. Attention will be given to administration and planning strategies for effective worship events. The course will also explore the incorporation of music and the fine arts in worship and issues of cross-cultural worship.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MWST 566 - Media and Technology in Worship


     

    This course is designed to examine the origins, roles and current practices of worship leaders using visual media technologies as a part of church services. Discussion topics include an overview of the emerging role of the media minister, as well as the uses and effects of these communication technologies. The course will also evaluate hardware and equipment as well as an exploration of software used to produce and display visual electronic media. Emerging technologies will be explored for use in worship settings.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MWST 590 - Worship Studies Final Project


    This course is intended as a final research project within the MINST program.  Students will research a specific area within worship ministry and provide evidence of biblical, theological, or social science research.  In addition, students will prepare a project presentation based on the questions raised by the foundational research.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MWST 593 - Worship Studies Internship


    This course is designed for students who have not had practical experience in worship ministry. It may be done in lieu of a final project so that students may experience supervised worship ministry.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 550 - Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry


    This course will examine the biblical and theological foundations of the family with specific focus on the place of children and adolescents within the family structure. Various models of youth and family ministry will be examined, and through the use of lectures, research, and case studies, the student will develop a family ministry program which will be applicable in his/her ministerial setting.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 552 - Discipleship in Contemporary Culture


    This course will equip youth leaders for the task of carrying out the Great Commission in a postmodern society. Included will be an examination of key New Testament texts of discipleship, an identification of vital principles used by Christ and the first century church, and a critique of contemporary models. Special consideration will be given to the unique challenges presented by contemporary culture. The goal for each student will be to develop a discipleship model that will systematically take a student from the initial stage of being evangelized through the steps of Christian growth and formation.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 554 - Theological Issues in Youth and Family Ministry


     

    This course will provide students with an overview of the task of theology as it relates to ministry to children, adolescents and families. It will focus on several issues of particular importance to youth and family ministry, offering a theological basis and dialogue for each issue. Some issues and their concomitant theological areas that may be investigated are the following: human personality and theological anthropology; sexuality and a theology of sex; estrangement and a theology of reconciliation; abuse/disorders/violence and a theology of wholeness of life; suffering and a theology of suffering; school issues and a theology of learning; and other miscellaneous issues that may arise.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MYFM 556 - Adolescent Development


    This course is an examination of the developmental phenomena of adolescence, its physiological, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual dimensions, and the influence of context such as family, peers, schools, and community. Consideration of the needs of youth and interacting societal institutions, with a focus on continuity of development as viewed within the framework of life-span development will be studied.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 557 - Human Development and Transformation


    This course will examine central theories of human development and transformation in order to understand their implications for youth and family ministry. Emphasis will be placed upon the periods of childhood and adolescence. These theories will be placed in dialogue with research concerning religious transformation.

    Prerequisites
    none

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 558 - Marriage and Family Systems


    An introduction to general systems theory. Special attention is given to the history of marriage and family therapy and the basic theories of and models of family interaction. Implication for interactional patterns, functional and dysfunctional family systems, life cycle issues, and ethnicity are discussed.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 590 - Youth and Family Studies Final Project


    This course is intended as a final research project within the MINST program. Students will research a specific area within youth and/or family ministry and provide evidence of biblical, theological, or social science research. In addition, students will prepare a project presentation based on the questions raised by the foundational research.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MYFM 593 - Youth and Family Studies Internship


    This course is designed for students who have not had practical experience in youth and family ministry. It may be done in lieu of a final project so that students may experience supervised ministry with youth and families.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    PASM 271 - Fundamentals of Preaching (DAL)


    This course is a study of the construction and delivery of sermons.  Special attention is given to those elements of craftsmanship, style, and theological understanding basic to persuasive preaching.

    Prerequisites
    ENGL-106 & BIBL-261

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students only.
  
  •  

    PASM 371 - Techniques of Preaching (DAL)


    This course is a survey of various techniques utilized in Gospel communication. Topics include the appropriate use of both expository and topical preaching, creating rapport, telling the story, the ethical use of emotion, prophetic confrontation, and preaching in series, holidays, weddings, funerals, and community events.

    Prerequisites
    PASM-271

    Credit Hours: 3
    Open to Division of Adult Learning students only.
 

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