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    Dec 06, 2022  
Lee University Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Lee University Catalog 2016-2017 [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 

General and Interdisciplinary Studies

  
  •  

    GNST 252 - Cross-Cultural Experience


    A variable content course designed to allow students first-hand experiential learning while participating in a faculty-led cross-cultural experience including traveling, living and studying abroad or domestically.  Completion of the course requires documentation and reflection of experiences. Two credit hours will be awarded for extended international cross-cultural experiences one to two months in duration (GNST-252).

    Core Requirement.

    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: ANTH 200.

    Credit Hours: 2

  
  •  

    GNST 253 - Cross-Cultural Experience


    A variable content course designed to allow students first-hand experiential learning while participating in a faculty-led cross-cultural experience including traveling, living and studying abroad or domestically.  Completion of the course requires documentation and reflection of experiences.  Three credit hours will be awarded for semester-long international cross-cultural experiences (GNST-253).

    Core Requirement.

    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: ANTH 200.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    GNST 298 - Mentoring For Success


    A by-permission-only course which seeks to provide freshmen admitted on academic probation with the basic academic and organizational skills that will prepare them to be successful in college. Each student is paired with a peer for application of strategies and techniques learned, as well as for tutorial assistance. Students are required to sign a commitment contract before participating in the class.

     

     

    Credit Hours: 1
    When Offered
    Spring and Fall

  
  •  

    GRAD 591 - Degree Completion


    This course allows graduate students who have finished course work but have not completed comprehensive exams or other graduation requirements to maintain their status as an actively enrolled student. Student will be charged a one hour credit fee.

    Credit Hours: 0
    When Offered
    Every semester
  
  •  

    LEEU 101 - Freshman Seminar: Gateway to University Success


    This course is designed to equip first-year students for success in the Christian university community. It will acquaint students with the academic, social and critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in college. All first-time Lee students who have completed fewer than 16 credit hours of resident college work (in addition to AP or dual enrollment credits earned during high school) are required to take LEEU-101 in their first semester of enrollment.  Requires co-requisite enrollment in LEEU-101S (Service Learning).

    Core Requirement.

    Credit Hours: 1

  
  •  

    LEEU 201 - Transfer Gateway Seminar


    The Transfer Gateway Seminar is designed to equip first-semester transfer students for success in the Christian university community at Lee University. It will acquaint students with the core values of Lee University and introduce students to key aspects of the university that will contribute to their social and academic success. Requires co-requisite enrollment in LEEU-201S (Service Learning).

    Credit Hours: 1
    Notes
    Required for first-semester transfer students with fewer than 16 hours of post-high school college credit, and for all first-semester transfer students on academic probation.

Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 311 - Introduction to Geography


    The physical world, regional similarities and differences, and the settlements of mankind.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    GEOG 312 - Human Geography


    A course that examines cultural change and cultural regionalism, concepts and models of spatial interaction, and spatial behavior including geographical patterns of languages, religion, ethnic groups, folk and popular culture, and population geographical distribution of economic, urban and political organizations.

    Credit Hours: 3

German

  
  •  

    GERM 111 - Elementary German I


    A proficiency-oriented course designed to provide a functional elementary foundation in the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing in German along with an integrated study of German culture. 

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
    Notes
    Elective credit only. No proficiency credit.
  
  •  

    GERM 112 - Elementary German II


    A continuation of the proficiency-oriented elementary course (GERM-111). 

    Prerequisites
    GERM-111 or placement exam. Elective credit only. No proficiency credit.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring Semester
  
  •  

    GERM 211 - Intermediate German I


    A proficiency-oriented course designed to review essential structures in further detail and to improve the student’s ability in speaking, listening, reading and writing the German language.  One clock-hour lab required per week.

    Prerequisites
    GERM-112 or placement

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall Semester
    Notes
    Speakers who demonstrate near-native oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any course in that language below the 300 level.
  
  •  

    GERM 212 - Intermediate German II


    A continuation of the proficiency-oriented intermediate course (GERM-211). By the end of this course, the student should be prepared for more advanced study in the language and feel confident in being able to get along independently in a German-speaking country.  One clock-hour lab required per week.

    Prerequisites
    GERM-211 or placement

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
    Notes
    Speakers who demonstrate near-native oral proficiency in the target language may not enroll in any course in that language below the 300 level.
  
  •  

    GERM 501 - Theological German


    An introduction to theological German designed for the student who has little or no previous knowledge of the language. The course will focus on the basics of German grammar and syntax, while acquisition of vocabulary and translation drills will concentrate on religious and theological selections.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Summer, odd years
  
  •  

    GERM 502 - Readings in Theological German


    Continuing the course on introduction to theological German, this course reviews and extends the grammatical and syntactical aspects of the German language. Students will be exposed to a variety of philosophical and theological texts meant to prepare them for comprehension and reading of German for research in future work. With this goal in mind, the emphasis is on reading comprehension and extensive exposure of as many theological and biblical readings as possible. The prerequisite is GERM-501.

    Prerequisites
    GERM-501

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Summer, odd years

Greek

  
  •  

    GREK 211 - Elementary New Testament Greek


    A basic vocabulary and grammar study of New Testament Greek with drills in simple Greek reading.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
  •  

    GREK 212 - Elementary New Testament Greek


    A continuation of GREK-211 with more attention to syntax and reading.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-211.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
  •  

    GREK 311 - Intermediate New Testament Greek


    A continuation of GREK-212. Special attention is given to the handling of irregular verbs; more in-depth readings in Greek will be assigned.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-212.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
  •  

    GREK 312 - Intermediate New Testament Greek


    A continuation of GREK-311. A course in reading New Testament Greek, beginning with the simpler portions and advancing to more difficult areas of text.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-311.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
  •  

    GREK 417 - Grammatical Book Exegesis


    An exegetical study of material from the Greek text of a book of the professor’s choosing. Special attention is given to matters of interpretation and elements of advanced grammar.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-312.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
  
  •  

    GREK 418 - Grammatical Book Exegesis


    An exegetical study of material from the Greek text of a book of the professor’s choosing. Special attention is given to matters of interpretation and elements of advanced grammar.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-417.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
  
  •  

    GREK 494 - Advanced Reading in Classical Greek


    A course dedicated to furthering proficiency in Greek and expanding students’ knowledge of Greek beyond the limits of Koine Greek.  This task will be performed through sustained engagement with a single major author or genre/theme of classical literature (classical or Roman “classicizing” texts).  The primary goal is to expand and deepen a student’s philological skills through translation and analysis of Greek texts.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-212

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    This course is repeatable for credit as long as the author or genre is different for each separate enrollment.
  
  •  

    GREK 501 - Elementary New Testament Greek


    A basic vocabulary and grammar study of New Testament Greek with some drills in simple Greek reading. The course consists primarily of drills in vocabulary and grammar with an introduction to its use.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
  
  •  

    GREK 502 - Elementary New Testament Greek


    A continuation of GREK-501 with more attention to syntax and reading.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-501

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
  
  •  

    GREK 511 - Intermediate New Testament Greek


    This course offers a programmatic acquisition of the vocabulary and grammar of the Greek New Testament with special emphasis on the linguistic and theological contributions found in the Epistle of 1 John.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-502.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
  
  •  

    GREK 512 - Intermediate New Testament Greek


    A continuation of GREK-511.  A course in reading New Testament Greek, beginning with the simpler portions and advancing to more difficult areas of text.

    Prerequisites
    GREK-511

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester

Health

  
  •  

    HLTH 291 - Principles of Nutrition


    Study of food and its relationship to the well-being of the human body with emphasis upon metabolism, nutritive value and quantitative requirements of food at different age and development levels. The selection and eating of foods at different economic, social and cultural levels are also studied.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HLTH 352 - Substance Use and Abuse


    A study in the basic principles of drug action, side effects and toxic effects. Implications for the health education professional will be emphasized.

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HLTH 353 - Safety and First Aid


    The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the prevention of common accidents in the home, school, industry, transportation and recreation.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    HLTH 357 - Human Sexuality


    This course is a study of the sociological, psychological, biological, ethical and legal components of human sexuality.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HLTH 360 - Personal and Community Health


    This course emphasizes the concepts, anatomical knowledge, risk factors and behaviors that profoundly affect personal health and self-care. It addresses consumer issues and criteria for evaluating health products and services in the private, industry and government sectors.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
  •  

    HLTH 361 - Kinesiology


    Review of basic anatomy, primarily the muscular system; relationship of the fundamental laws of physics to human movement, and mechanical principles of skill instruction and analysis.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-103 or HSCI-292.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HLTH 365 - Child Health and Social Behavior


    A study of the physical and psychosocial growth and development of children; includes methods of organizing and implementing health measures, determining health status through screening processes; detection of remedial defects, referral procedures, and follow-up for correction; the promotion of physical, mental, social and emotional health through environmental and special health services.

    Credit Hours: 3

Health Science

  
  •  

    HSCI 199 - Introduction to Health Care


    An introduction to the U.S. health care system accompanied by a brief survey of the major health professions and paraprofessions utilized in meeting the health care needs of modern society.  Requires co-requisite enrollment in FMPT-HSC (Freshman Major Pre-Test Health Science).

    Credit Hours: 1
  
  •  

    HSCI 211 - International Health: Latin American Health Studies


    A survey of the health status and health systems of global populations with an emphasis on Latin American populations and public health and health care delivery.  This course is taught only as part of the Summer of Studies in Medical Missions (SOSMM) Program.  The course has 20 clock hours of service embedded; requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-211S.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-109 and 109L, and acceptance into SOSMM program.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Summer only.
  
  •  

    HSCI 231 - Health Professions Internship


    A course that provides experience for students entering the delivery of health care at a variety of health facilities prior to entering professional schools. These supervIsed opportunities will allow students to better understand the distinctions of their chosen profession and to become more aware of how their profession will integrate into the larger health care delivery environment.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-242 or HSCI-250. Limited to juniors and seniors who possess a strong commitment to a given health profession.

    Credit Hours: 1
  
  •  

    HSCI 250 - Microbiology for Health Sciences


    A beginning course in basic microbiology and epidemiology for students preparing for allied health professions. The character of microbial organisms and infectious diseases are studied with emphasis on modes of transmission, diagnosis, treatment, management and control. Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-250L.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-109 and CHEM-112 or 113 with a grade of C- or better, OR CHEM-101 and HSCI-293 with a grade of C- or better

    Credit Hours: 4
  
  •  

    HSCI 271 - 274 - Special Topics in Health Sciences


    A course used to comply with requests for special topics in health science.  Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI 250

    Credit Hours: 1-4
    When Offered
    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    HSCI 285 - Pre-Professional Seminar


    A course designed to prepare pre-health professions students for the rigors of applying to and attending graduate school. It is intended to enhance entrance exam scores for health professions schools.  This Seminar should be taken during the second semester Sophomore year or first semester Junior year.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-242 or HSCI-292.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    HSCI 291 - Principles of Nutrition


    Study of food and its relationship to the well-being of the human body with emphasis upon metabolism, nutritive value and quantitative requirements of food at different age and development levels. The selection and eating of foods at different economic, social and cultural levels are also studied.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL 109 and CHEM-101 or CHEM-112 or CHEM-113

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 292 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    A study of the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, integumentary and endocrine systems and their role in support, movement, integration, and control of the human body. An emphasis upon cells, cell processes, and tissues precedes consideration of the systems. Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-292L. Intended for Nursing, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science majors.

    Prerequisites
    CHEM-101

    Credit Hours: 4
    Notes
    Not intended for Science majors.
  
  •  

    HSCI 293 - Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    Intended for Nursing or Athletic Training majors.  A study of the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Lecture and laboratory emphasize the role of these systems in the maintenance and continuation of life. Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-293L.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-292

    Credit Hours: 4
    Notes
    Not intended for Science majors.
  
  •  

    HSCI 295 - Medical Missions Internship


    Provides students an opportunity to have hands on experience providing medical care in a developing country. It provides directed learning under the mentorship of medical and dental professionals in a crosscultural setting.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-109 and acceptance into the SOSMM Program.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    [NOTE: This course is service-enhanced and requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-295S.]
  
  •  

    HSCI 330 - Fitness, Wellness, and Lifestyle Management


    A course designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the assessment and development of physical fitness, with emphases on both personal application and group leadership.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 331 - Cardiovascular Health


    An in-depth study of heart disease, circulation, heart structure and function, and training responses. Emphases will be on health-related concepts including obesity, nutrition and stress.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-103 or HSCI-292 or HSCI-293.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 341 - Parasitology


    Life cycles, epidemiological factors, interrelationships of parasite and host, and underlying principles of treatment and prevention. Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-341L.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-109 and formal acceptance into SOSMM Program.

    Credit Hours: 4
    When Offered
    Offered summers.
  
  •  

    HSCI 344 - Exercise Physiology I


    This course is designed to provide the essential physiological background that is necessary for an understanding of the human response to exercise.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-103 or HSCI-292/293 and HSCI-361

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 352 - Substance Use and Abuse


    A study in the basic principles of drug action, side effects and toxic effects. Implications for the health education professional will be emphasized.

    Credit Hours: 2
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HSCI 353 - Safety and First Aid


    The nature and causes of accidents and safety measures for the prevention of common accidents in the home, school, industry, transportation and recreation.

    Credit Hours: 2
  
  •  

    HSCI 357 - Human Sexuality


    A study of the sociological, psychological, biological, ethical and legal components of human sexuality.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 360 - Personal and Community Health


    This course emphasizes the concepts, anatomical knowledge, risk factors and behaviors that profoundly affect personal health and self-care. It addresses consumer issues and criteria for evaluating health products and services in the private, industry and government sectors.

    Credit Hours: 4
  
  •  

    HSCI 361 - Kinesiology


    Review of basic anatomy, primarily the muscular system; relationship of the fundamental laws of physics to human movement, and mechanical principles of skill instruction and analysis.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-103 or HSCI-292.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HSCI 365 - Child Health & Social Behavior


    A study of the physical and psychosocial growth and development of children; includes methods of organizing and implementing health measures, determining health status through screening processes; detection of remedial defects, referral procedures and follow-up for correction; the promotion of physical, mental, social and emotional health through environmental and special health services.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 371 - 374 - Special Topics in Health Sciences


    Courses designed to comply with requests for special topics and advanced studies in health science. Lecture and laboratory hours will vary with the courses taught. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-293

    Credit Hours: 1 to 4
    When Offered
    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    HSCI 382 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    Designed for Biology and Health Science majors.  A systematic study of the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems and their role in support, movement, integratory, and control of the human budy.  An emphasis upon cells, cell processes, and tissue preced consideration of these systems.  Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-382L.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-250

    Credit Hours: 4
    Notes
    Not intended for Nursing or Athletic Training majors.
  
  •  

    HSCI 383 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    Designed for Biology or Health Science majors.  A systematic study of the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.  Lecture and laboratory emphasize the role of these systems in the maintenance and continuation of life.  Requires co-requisite enrollment in HSCI-383L.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-382

    Credit Hours: 4
    Notes
    Not intended for Nursing or Athletic Training majors.
  
  •  

    HSCI 391 - Principles of Pharmacology


    A study of basic principles of drug action and the therapeutic application of the major pharmacological classification of drugs in the treatment of disease. Side effects, toxic effects and implications for the health professional are emphasized.

    Prerequisites
    CHEM-113 or CHEM-281.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    HSCI 398 - Medical Terminology


    An introduction to the basic principles of medical terminology and assistance in learning the terms by applying them in clinical case histories, practice examples, and programmed instruction. The course is intended primarily for students entering the health-related professions, although it would benefit any student of the biological sciences.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL 103 or HSCI 293

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 399 - Nutrition for Health and Performance


    This second nutrition course covers nutritional needs of diseased persons and those participating in various types and levels of physical activity and sport.

     

    Prerequisites
    CHEM-110 or 111, HSCI-291 and HSCI-344

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    HSCI 411 - International Health: Latin American Health Studies


    A survey of the health status of Latin American populations and public health and health care delivery systems. This course is taught only as part of the Summer of Studies in Medical Missions (SOSMM) Program.  This course has 20 service hours embedded, students must co-register for HSCI 411S.

    Prerequisites
    BIOL-109 and acceptance into the SOSMM.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 444 - Exercise Physiology II


    This course is designed to provide a deeper understanding and application of concepts introduced in HSCI-344.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-291, HSCI-344 and HSCI -361

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Spring Semester.
    Notes
    Cross-Listed with PHED-444
  
  •  

    HSCI 450 - Exercise Testing and Prescription


    A course providing knowledge and practical experience in exercise testing procedures and in the principles and guidelines of safe and effective exercise prescription.

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-331 or HSCI-444.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HSCI 465/475 - Practicum in Teaching


    A practicum which gives students the opportunity to gain teaching experience, enhance their knowledge of natural science and mathematics, and acquire skills that make them more attractive to prospective graduate schools.

    Prerequisites
    Successful completion of 15hrs of regualr major courses in their program. Requires approval of application and permission of instructor.

    Credit Hours: 1
  
  •  

    HSCI 470 - Internship in Exercise Science


    The internship experience provides an opportunity for students to bridge the gap between theory and practice by gaining practical experience in an approved fitness/wellness agency under the general supervision of a University supervisor. 

    Prerequisites
    HSCI-450 or concurrent enrollment

     

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    HSCI 495 - Integration of Faith and Practice


    A capstone course designed to provide senior health science majors and pre-professional students with opportunities to study, discuss, defend and integrate a Christian world view into the health care arenas.

    Prerequisites
    THEO-231 and HSCI 398 or CHEM-322

    Credit Hours: 3

Healthcare Administration

  
  •  

    HLTC 210 - Introduction to Healthcare Administration


    An introduction to the nature, organization and functions of the continuum of health services found in the U.S. health care system.  The roles performed by providers, managers and consumers of health care will be explored. Special interest will be paid to the operational side of health care administration. Current issues will be analyzed.  Offered Fall Semester.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Co-requisite: HLTC-210L
  
  •  

    HLTC 210L - Practicum in Healthcare Administration


    This course is an introductory shadowing experience taken in conjunction with HLTC 210. Students will spend a minimum of 40 hours in a healthcare facility under the supervision of the instructor of HLTC-210. Contingent on availability, students will complete the practicum in a healthcare facility correlated to their career interest.  Offered Fall Semester.

    Credit Hours: 0
    Notes
    Co-requisite: HLTC-210
  
  •  

    HLTC 490 - Healthcare Administration Internship


     

    Healthcare Administration Internship is designed to provide practical experience in healthcare organizations for seniors in the Healthcare Administration program.  The course seeks to provide a pre-professional training experience in which students can apply multi-disciplinary knowledge acquired in classroom settings to situations in a healthcare organization.  A minimum of 2 credit hrs of HLTC-490 is required of all students in the program.  Some students may want to elect a second internship.

    Prerequisites
    Instructor consent

    Credit Hours: 1 - 6
    Notes
    This course is repeatable for credit.


Hebrew

  
  •  

    HEBR 301 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew


    This course is an introduction to Hebrew that is designed to introduce students to the basic vocabulary and grammar of the Hebrew Bible.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
  
  •  

    HEBR 302 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew


    This course is a continuation of HEBR-301. It builds on the vocabulary and grammar of HEBR-301 and gives students a working knowledge of the standard grammatical and lexical resources for exegetical work. Students will also begin reading the text of the Hebrew Bible.

    Prerequisites
    HEBR-301.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester
  
  •  

    HEBR 311 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I


    Designed to give the student who has completed two semesters of introductory Hebrew further instruction and practice in grammar and syntax by translating larger blocks of biblical Hebrew from different genres of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament.

    Prerequisites
    HEBR-301 and HEBR-302

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 312 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II


    A continuation of HEBR-311, building upon the grammatical foundation already achieved from three semesters of Hebrew studies, yet progressing to more advanced studies in Old Testament exegesis rooted in a select Old Testament book.  Matters of interpretation and elements of advanced grammar will be discussed.

    Prerequisites
    HEBR-301, HEBR-302, and HEBR-311

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 501 - Elementary Biblical Hebrew


    This course is an introduction to Hebrew that is designed to introduce students to the basic vocabulary and grammar of the Hebrew Bible.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Fall semester
  
  •  

    HEBR 502 - Readings in Biblical Hebrew


    This course is a continuation of HEBR-501. It builds on the vocabulary and grammar of HEBR-501 and gives students a working knowledge of the standard grammatical and lexical resources for exegetical work. Students will also begin reading the text of the Hebrew Bible.

    Prerequisites
    HEBR-501.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Spring semester

History

  
  •  

    HISA 213 - American History Through the Reconstruction


    A history of the American people and their relationship to the world with special emphasis on the United States and its development through the Reconstruction. 

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Open only to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
  •  

    HISA 214 - American History 1877 through 1945


    A history of the American people and their relationship to the world with special emphasis on the United States and its development from the end of Reconstruction through World War II.

    Credit Hours: 3
    Notes
    Open only to Division of Adult Learning students.
  
  •  

    HIST 211 - American History: Colonial through 1877


    A history of the American people and their relationship to the world with a special emphasis on the United States and its development through the Civil War.

    Credit Hours: 3
    DAL
  
  •  

    HIST 212 - Recent American History


    An introduction to American History and the operation of the U. S. political system at the federal level in the twentieth century. People, events, ideas, and policies that have significantly influenced contemporary society will be emphasized.

    Credit Hours: 3
    This course is also available for students in a Division of Adult Learning program.
  
  •  

    HIST 221 - Survey of Western Civilization I


    A general historical survey of the economic, religious, cultural, geographical and political developments of western civilization from the Greeks through 1660 C.E.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 222 - Survey of Western Civilization II


    A continuation of History 221, from 1660 C.E. to the present.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 280-289 - Seminars, Special Topics


    This course is intended to allow students who have minimal background in history to explore selected topics in the discipline.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 298 - Historical Methods


    An introduction to the methods of analyzing and interpreting history at the university level, as well as the way in which the study and interpretation of history has changed over time. Required of all history majors, it should be taken as early as possible upon declaring major.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 301 - Colonial America


    This course examines the major issues confronting colonial Americans from the late 16th- to the mid-18th centuries, with a particular emphasis on British North America and the Atlantic World.  By exploring how social, cultural, religious, political, and economic forces formed Americans’ identity and led to the ultimate break between them and their European cousins, we gain a greater understanding of the formative events in our nation’s history.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 311 - The American Revolution


    This course examines the revolutionary origins of American republic, the war it fought to secure independence from Great Britain, its efforts to create a constitution, and the consequences and legacy of these experiences.  In addition to introducing people, events and ideas, it will provide a foundation upon which students can build their own critical interpretation of how the history of Revolutionary America affects their lives.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 312 - The Early American Republic


    This course engages social, economic, and political topics in the early national period of the United States, from 1787 to 1845.  We will explore the history of national politics from the presidency of George Washington through the Jacksonian Era, the United States’ development into a national republic, the rise and evolution of American democracy, the market revolution, Manifest Destiny, slavery and sectionalism, and the creation of an American identity.

    Prerequisites
    None.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 313 - The Civil War and Reconstruction


    An examination of the causes, course and immediate aftermath of the Civil War from 1840 to 1877.  We will examine the goals and policies of the respective governments; political, economic and strategic factors affecting both sides; and politics in both the North and the South, including ideology and slavery.  We will also examine the course and consdquences of Reconstruction and its abandonment, and follow its evolution from Presidential to Congressional and Radical Reconstruction.  Finall, we will also examine how Americans remember and forget their Civil War, and how the conflict has shaped American history and popular culture.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 315 - The Gilded and Progressive Age


    An in-depth study of the United States from 1865 to 1900.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HIST 316 - The United States: 1920-1945


    This course examines social, political, and economic developments in the United States during the 1920’s, the Great Depression, and World War II.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 318 - The United States: 1968-2000


    This course studies the social, economic, and political history of the United States from 1972 to 2000.  In addition to intoducing people, events and ideas, it will provide a foundation upon which students can build their own critical interpretation of how the history of the United States affects their lives.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 320 - Topics in American Foreign Relations


    This course examines historical topics in American foreign relations which touch upon issues of national power, territorial acquisition, warfare, economic expansion, and national identity.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 325 - American Sports History


    This course examines the historical development of sports in the United States.  the course examines the relationship between sports and broader themes in American history, including race, gender, capitalism, reform, higher education and class.  

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 326 - American Military History


    This course explores the history of the American military experience from the colonial era to the present.  It addresses the military as an American institution, as an instrument of national power, as a growing and evolving organization, and as an influence on American society.  This course will examine these subjects in the context of military theory and American military doctrine, the Constitution, national security strategy, and social and cultural legacies.  Students will gain a working knowledge of these concepts and then use them to analyze the leaders, battles, campaigns, and wars that define the American military experience.

    Prerequisites
    None

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 327 - Hollywood and History


    This course evaluates filmmakers’ communication of history to their audiences.  It also examines how movies reflect the perceptions, traditions, values, fears, and aspirations of their generation.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 333 - History of Christianity


    A historical study of the Christian Church from the apostolic period to the late-medieval era. Special emphasis is placed on historical prolegomena; the development of the Christian Church in terms of missionary expansion, persecution, organization, worship and creedal formulation; and interaction between the Church and incipient national states to c. 1300.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 334 - History of Christianity II


    A historical study of the Renaissance and Reformation movements, the Council of Trent, the response of the Christian Church to the Enlightenment, Protestant Orthodoxy, the continuing interaction between Christianity and culture, and the American religious experience to the present.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 338 - A History of the Bible


    A historical study of the text, canon, transmission and translations of the Bible from the close of the New Testament to the present with a special emphasis on the history of the English Bible.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    HIST 342 - The Renaissance and Reformation


    A study of political, economic, religious and cultural developments of the Renaissance and Reformation eras.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    HIST 347 - Modern Europe


    A study of Europe from 1815 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the roles of liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, socialism, imperialism, the industrial revolution, the world wars, and the cold war in shaping Europe today.

    Credit Hours: 3
    When Offered
    Offered Fall Semester, even years.
  
  •  

    HIST 351 - History of Colonial Latin America


    An introduction to the history of Latin America under colonial rule. Particular attention will be paid to ancient American civilizations; conquest; major features of colonial politics, economics, society and culture; changes over time in colonial society; imperial reforms; and rebellions and independence movements.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 352 - History of Modern Latin America


    An introduction to the political, economic and social history of Latin America during the national period, roughly 1810 to the present. Not intended to cover each of the Latin American nations in depth, this course employs themes to survey the broad scope of Latin America as a whole. Particular themes include problems and solutions of building nations and unified national identities, of creating viable political systems, and of developing modern economies.

    Credit Hours: 3
  
  •  

    HIST 355 - Survey of Asian History


    A broad survey of the history of monsoon Asia, from prehistory to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the rise of urban civilizations in Asia; development and interaction of the religions and cultures in those civilizations; the rise of economic systems linking different parts of Asia; the influence of contact with non-Asian regions and peoples on the history of Asia; and modern efforts of Asians to adapt their societies to European ideas regarding politics and economics.

    Credit Hours: 3
 

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